Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for March 5th, 2011

We spent the last four days traveling up the beautiful Carolina coastlines and our only regret is that the temperature never got above 55.

Our first stop was in Charleston, South Carolina.  We drove through the historic section of the city, marveling at the gorgeous old homes and stopped in their French Quarter for dinner.  We ate seafood at A.W. Shucks, and our 11 year old Allison had her first experience with oysters.  She tried both broiled and fried, and declared that  “the broiled one tasted like a nickel”.  We really enjoyed driving over all of the grand bridges connecting the city and viewing the hundreds of boats docked in the water.  The next morning we continued to explore the area.  On James Island, we found the offices of  “Trademark Properties” owned by Richard Davis and featured on TLC’s “Flip This House”.

Our second stop was a couple hours north at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  We had no idea of what to expect of Myrtle Beach, and what we found was similar to Galveston’s Seawall Boulevard on steroids.

The main road along the beach featured miles of hotels, restaurants, t-shirt shops, and miniature golf courses as far as the eye could see.  Myrtle Beach must be home to the most miniature golf courses per capita in the entire world.  We ate lunch at the Pier 14 Restaurant over the beach.  The food was very good and the view was spectacular.

A walk down the beach after lunch yielded some of the best (and largest) shells we had ever seen.  Needless to say, the kids requested that we take some back to Texas with us.  The beaches were incredible, and we left wishing we could visit on a summer day rather than the 55 degree day with 25 mph winds. It was COLD!

We then headed back to the main drag to play golf at Mt. Atlanticus.

Mom, who is a connoisseur of miniature golf courses, proclaimed this “the greatest miniature golf course ever!”  Challenging multi-story holes (some as high as 75 feet off the ground!) and an over-the-top theme make this course unique.  We played both the “Minotaur” and “Conch” courses and had a fabulous time.

Dad conveniently forgot to total the scores at the end of the day (thus not having to admit defeat to the obviously superior Mom).  At first glance, we assumed that Myrtle Beach was just a “beach town”, but leaving town we drove through the newer part of the city filled with luxury homes, golf courses, and more restaurants than could be believed.

Wilmington, North Carolina, was supposed to be our next stop, but much like Mary & Joseph, we were told there was no room at the inn.  Our intended hotel was being remodeled, so we moved 10 miles north to Wrightsville Beach and  proved once again that everything on this trip happens for a reason.  We loved everything about the Holiday Inn Resort on Wrightsville Beach.

The only bad thing was that we were only passing through and did not get to experience a three or four day stay here.  The morning included another quick walk on the beach, cut short due to the extremely strong and very cold wind.

The Outer Banks, North Carolina, was our final stop on the coast.  We arrived in Kill Devil Hills and were greeted with temperatures in the low 40s and gale force winds. Luckily Mom insisted that we bring our winter coats on this leg of the trip, so we were ready.

The Outer Banks is a small strip of islands on the North Carolina Coast and is home to the towns of Cape Hatteras, Kill Devil Hills, and Kitty Hawk.  The next morning, we visited The Wright Brothers National Memorial,  the site where Orville & Wilbur Wright completed the first successful power driven flight in December of 1903.

Replicas of both the glider and first airplane the Wrights designed, built, and flew are on display here.  The park ranger presentation was really informative, and the kids thought it was cool to get to run the exact path and distances of the first four flights.  Another Junior Ranger Patch was earned and another notch was added to our history belt.

Later that afternoon, we drove south along the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, and we were struck by the isolated, unspoiled beaches.  Thousands of homes line the beaches of the Outer Banks, but once inside the National Seashore, the only buildings around are a few lighthouses and visitor centers.  The only things you see are miles and miles of sand dunes, huge crashing waves, and all types of birds.  Most of the time was spent in the car, but we did brave the cold to take a few pictures.

We really enjoyed the beauty of our trip up the Carolina Coast, and would love to visit again in warmer weather.  By the amount of hotels and retail establishments we saw, it seems as though much of the eastern half of the United States would agree that this is the place to be during the summer.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »