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Posts Tagged ‘Wingate by Wyndham’

We left Cherokee, North Carolina, on a rainy Saturday evening and headed south to Atlanta.  Driving in the dark while it is raining with a van full of tired people will always test the mettle of the driver.  We could not make it all the way to Atlanta, and decided to stop for the night in the suburb of Buford, 30 miles north of Atlanta.  We found the Wingate by Wyndham in Buford so enjoyable that we made it our home for the next three nights.

Our first day was a day of rest.  Dad and the kids went swimming in the pool for a couple of hours while Mom did laundry and enjoyed some quiet time in the room.  Quiet time is very hard to come by when you are with your family 24 hours a day.  That evening we met Mom’s college roommate and her family for dinner.  Dodie gave us the lay of the land in Atlanta and some suggestions of places we should visit.

The next morning we headed to downtown Atlanta to visit the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Site.  We had been a little worried about the notoriously bad traffic, but we left around 10:00 and had no problems getting downtown.

The Martin Luther King Jr. Historical Site is a complex operated by the National Park Service and includes the home where MLK, Jr. was born and grew up, his tomb, the Ebenezer Baptist Church, an Interpretive Center, and the King Center For Non-Violent Social Change.  Luckily, we had a beautiful day and enjoyed the walks between the buildings in the neighborhood known as “Sweet Auburn”, where Martin had played as a boy.

Similar to Independence Hall in Philadelphia, you must have a ticket to tour the birthplace.  Tickets are free but limited in number and must be obtained the day of your visit.  We picked up tickets to take the guided tour of MLK, Jr’s birthplace and childhood home, and then visited the final resting place of Martin and Coretta Scott King.

The atmosphere in the courtyard is peaceful and serene.  The Kings’ tombs are set above a reflecting pool and an eternal flame burns in their memory.

We met our Birthplace tour guide on the steps of the beautiful historic house built in 1895.

Over the years, the National Park Service has purchased and restored most of the homes on the block where MLK, Jr. grew up, so you get a very accurate feel for what the street looked like at the time.

The interior of the home has been restored to look as it did back in the 1930s when MLK, Jr. lived there.  Martin and his two siblings were born in the house because their father did not want them to be born in a segregated hospital.  The tour was very interesting and helped give us a more complete picture of MLK, Jr. and the influences that shaped his future.  It was hard to believe that we were walking through the house where one of the most influential people of the 20th century lived, played, did chores, and studied, just as our kids do.

After touring the home, we walked through the neighborhood fire station a few doors down. MLK, Jr. walked past this station every day.  One of the few segregated institutions in this vibrant black community, it was a constant reminder of the need for change.  Andrew really liked the vintage fire engine inside, and it was interesting to learn about fire fighting in the 1930s.

A few blocks away from the Birthplace is Ebenezer Baptist Church where his father was the preacher and MLK, Jr. was ordained at age 19.  Unfortunately, the church is closed for a major renovation project, so we were not able to go inside.

In the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Non-Violent Social Change, we saw many of the personal effects of Martin and Coretta Scott King.  It is really cool to see actual items from such an important part of our country’s history.  Our daughters found the wall of photographs very interesting.

This is the room key for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s room at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis.

In the NPS Visitor Center, we watched an inspiring film about children in the Civil Rights Movement and saw many multimedia exhibits about key events in the Movement.  Here we had an “putting the pieces together” moment.  Our 4-year old Andrew saw statues representing the “March from Selma to Montgomery” led by Dr. King in 1965 and stated, “Hey, that is the march!”  We were able to learn a lot about the Civil Rights Movement in the South, and the MLK, Jr. National Historic Site was a great way to wrap it up.  (You can read about the other Civil Rights sites we visited here.)

The next day we drove to historic Grant Park in Atlanta to see the Atlanta Cyclorama and Civil War Museum.

This attraction teaches its visitors about The Battle of Atlanta in 1864 where General Sherman and the Union Troops defeated the Confederate troops, capturing the city of Atlanta.  The main attraction here is an oil painting depicting the battle in great detail, but this is no ordinary oil painting.  Completed in the 1880s, this panoramic painting in the round is over 40 feet tall and encompasses more than 16,000 square feet.  We sat in theater style seats that rotated in a circle, allowing us to see all of the painting as a narrator described the events of the battle.  It was really amazing, but even more so when you realize that the painting was done over 120 years ago.

A sample of the incredible detail in the painting

In the attached exhibit hall are many artifacts from the many Civil War battles fought in Georgia.  Our kids were amazed that the soldiers wore thick wool uniforms all year long, even in the 95+ degree heat.  Seeing the actual weapons coupled with the great detail from the painting helped them visualize and understand how terrible the battles must have been.  Also on site is the original steam engine “Texas” that was involved in the Great Locomotive Chase, a very interesting Civil War event we had never heard of before.  (You can read about our visits to other Civil War sites here.)

After the museum, we made the final and greatest stop on our barbeque tour of the south, Daddy D’z BBQ Joynt.  At first glance, this was the type of place that we would normally have been hesitant to go into.

Year Long Adventure declares this the best BBQ ever!

Luckily we gave it a try, and had the best meal of the trip.  The service was excellent and the food was even better.  We were still raving about it days later.  If you like barbeque and you find yourself in Atlanta, then you need to eat here.  We promise, you will thank us afterward.

You can follow our adventures at Year Long Adventure on Facebook.

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We awoke in our palatial hotel room at the Wingate by Wyndham with grand plans to go into Philadelphia and visit all of the historical sites.  A quick look out the window into the pouring rain led to a change of plans that included only indoor activities.

Our first stop of the day was in Nottingham, PA, for the Herr’s Foods Snack Factory Tour.  Herr Foods started in 1946 when James Herr bought a truck and three iron pots for cooking potato chips for $1750.  From these humble beginnings, Herr’s has grown into a major enterprise, selling over 340 different snack food items in 20 states.

The factory tour led us through all phases of their chip and pretzel making processes and was really cool.  The machinery used to make chips and other snacks on such a grand scale was amazing.  Unfortunately, no cameras were allowed, so you’ll have to take our word for it.  The best part of the tour was getting to sample warm potato chips that had just come of the line on their way headed to the bagging stations.

Our second indoor stop of the day led us to New Castle, Delaware, and Bowlerama.  The family bowled two games (luckily we paid by the game and not by the hour because we bowl VERY slowly), and everyone had a grand time.

Thanks to a little iPhone research we found our dining venue for the evening.  We headed to a nearby mall in Delaware that had another Cheesecake Factory.  Two nights in a row at the same restaurant is no problem for this group, especially when cheesecake is involved.

Despite the rain, we had a great, fun-filled day!

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